More on “O Come Emmanuel”

More on

“O Come, O Come Emmanuel”

Mary and Joseph on their way to Bethlehem; a still-shot from the movie The Nativity Story.  Click the image for great articles about the movie at DecentFilms.com.

Mary and Joseph on their way to Bethlehem; a still-shot from the movie The Nativity Story. Click the image for great articles about the movie at DecentFilms.com.

Yesterday, I posted a link to Enya singing “O Come, O Come Emmanuel.”  In that post, I mentioned a little of the history of the song; and something WAY COOL about it.

Today, I read an article posted by Sandro Magister at Chiesa about that very same thing.  Let me give you just a small quote; then head over there to check out the rest of the article.

From today until the day before Christmas Eve, at the Magnificat during vespers in the Roman rite, seven antiphons are sung, one per day, all of them beginning with an invocation to Jesus, although he is never called by name.

The antiphons are very old, going back to the time of Pope Gregory the Great, around the year 600. They are in Latin, and are inspired by the texts of the Old Testament proclaiming the Messiah.

Read starting from the last, the Latin initials of these words form an acrostic: “Ero cras,” meaning: “I will be [there] tomorrow.” It is the proclamation of the Lord who comes. The last antiphon, which completes the acrostic, is sung on December 23, and the following day, with first vespers, the feast of the Nativity begins.

The article goes on to list each stanza and the date it should be sung.  The stanzas include Scriptural references to show the Biblical basis for the song.

Check out the article.

Meanwhile, here’s another version of the song.  This time, it’s sung in Latin IN ST. PETER’S BASILICA.

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This entry was posted in Culture, Elements of Faith, Praise & Worship Music, Prayer. Bookmark the permalink.

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