Let All Mortal Flesh Keep Silence

Let All Mortal Flesh Keep Silence

Christmas Eve. So close to the joyful event that signals the start of our redemption. 

But, we’re not there yet.  That’s tomorrow.

However, there are a couple of traditional Christmas songs that take us right up to this point in our prayerful watch.  And both of them have the idea of “silence” in their titles.

The first song is “Let All Mortal Flesh Keep Silence” being sung by Cynthia Clawson.

LET ALL MORTAL FLESH KEEP SILENCE

Let all mortal flesh keep silence,
And with fear and trembling stand;
Ponder nothing earthly minded,
For with blessing in His hand,
Christ our God to earth descendeth,
Our full homage to demand.

King of kings, yet born of Mary,
As of old on earth He stood,
Lord of lords, in human vesture,
In the body and the blood;
He will give to all the faithful
His own self for heavenly food.

Rank on rank the host of heaven
Spreads its vanguard on the way,
As the Light of light descendeth
From the realms of endless day,
That the powers of hell may vanish
As the darkness clears away.

At His feet the six wingèd seraph,
Cherubim with sleepless eye,
Veil their faces to the presence,
As with ceaseless voice they cry:
Alleluia, Alleluia
Alleluia, Lord Most High!

The second song, “Silent Night“,  is a more better known, and just as beautiful, no matter what language it is sung in.  Keeping with the Enya theme from yesterday, this version has Enya singing it in Irish Gaelic.  (Check out this cool website that gives a definition for each of the Gaelic words).

Oíche Chiún [Silent Night]

Oíche chiúin, oíche Mhic Dé, [Silent night, night of God’s son.]
Cách ‘na suan dís araon, [Soundly in slumber, the pair together]
Dís is dílse ‘faire le spéis [The pair and love, watching with affection]
Naoín beag gnaoigheal [The small bright beautiful child,]
ceananntais caomh [darling little one.]

Críost, ‘na chodhladh go séimh. [Christ, calmly asleep.]
Críost, ‘na chodhladh go séimh. [Christ, calmly asleep.]

Oíche chiúin, oíche Mhic Dé, [Silent night, night of God’s son.]
Aoirí ar dtús chuala ‘n scéal; [Shepherds first heard the tale]
Allelúia aingeal ag glaoch. [The angels crying out Alleluia.]
Cantain suairc i ngar is i gcéin [Lovely chanting near and far.]

Críost an Slánaitheoir Féin [Christ, the saviour himself.]
Críost an Slánaitheoir Féin [Christ, the saviour himself.]

Oíche chiúin, oíche Mhic Dé, [Silent night, night of God’s son.]
Cách ‘na suan dís araon, [Soundly in slumber, the pair together]
Dís is dílse ‘faire le spéis [The pair and love, watching with affection]
Naoín beag gnaoigheal [The small bright beautiful child,]
ceananntais caomh [darling little one.]

Críost, ‘na chodhladh go séimh. [Christ, calmly asleep.]
Críost, ‘na chodhladh go séimh. [Christ, calmly asleep.]

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This entry was posted in Elements of Faith, Feasts and Solemnities, Praise & Worship Music, Prayer. Bookmark the permalink.

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